L’argot des jeunes anglophones en 2016 - un article en ligne sur The Conversation

lundi 4 janvier 2016
 Laure PESKINE

Par Tony Thorne
Director of Slang and New Language Archive, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, King’s College London

Dinter, bitz and gwop : a guide to youth slang in 2016

A defining characteristic of youth slang is thought to be its faddishness – the fact that terms have a rapid turnover, quickly coming in and out of fashion and then disappearing before parents and teachers have time to decode them. The reality is more complicated : novelty is all-important but for each generation the expressions they encounter will be new to them. So although each age group and almost every local clique do invent their own words, there is a common core of slang that persists for years : such as cool, wicked, solid and sick for good, and chilling for relaxing.

The new language used by the young is not one unified dialect but an intersection of styles, with vocabulary drawn from a number of sources. There is the edgy street language of gangs which has given us shank and jook for stab ; and merk to hurt or humiliate. There is also boyed for shamed, durkboi and wallad for fool, dozens of terms for drugs and money and the greeting braap ! picked up and used by innocent teens who may not have realised that it imitates the sound of an automatic firearm.

À lire sur The Conversation


51/130
130/130
35/130
19/130
7/130
7/130
13/130
12/130
68/130
9/130
14/130
12/130
25/130
35/130
7/130
19/130
10/130
7/130
7/130
22/130
42/130
23/130
21/130
7/130
7/130
17/130
7/130
8/130
7/130
31/130
17/130
32/130
23/130
12/130
8/130
14/130
16/130
19/130
24/130
10/130
15/130
10/130
8/130
16/130
54/130
20/130
10/130
19/130
7/130
10/130

Si vous désirez recevoir notre lettre d’information envoyez un message vide à cette adresse :
lettres-subscribe@aplv-languesmodernes.org

JPEG - 40.8 ko
Découvrez nos ouvrages en Anglais, Allemand, Espagnol et FLE