À lire dans THE ATLANTIC : « Such Ado : The Fight for Shakespeare’s Puns »

jeudi 3 mars 2016
 Laure PESKINE

The evolution of English pronunciation has eroded much of the evidence of the Bard’s wit—but a new approach aims to bring some of his original wordplay back to life.

In Elizabethan English, the word “nothing” was pronounced as “no-ting,” and it suggested our modern sense of “noting” as “noticing” (and even as spying)—so, yep, yet another theme in the play. But ! There’s another pun, too. Wordplay-happy Elizabethans often used “nothing”/“no-ting” as a euphemism for ... “vagina.” (There’s no thing there, get it ?) Which means that the title Much Ado About Nothing, on top of everything else, also suggests Much Ado About … yeah

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Article publié le 2/03/2016 sur THE ATLANTIC.


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